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ACCESS

Reference:

The right, opportunity, means of finding, using, or retrieving information, usually subject to rules and conditions.


ACCOUNTABILITY

Reference:

The principle that individuals, organisations, and the community are responsible for their actions and may be required to explain them to others (such as regulatory authorities, shareholders, members, and the public).


ACTIVITY

Reference:

The second level of a business classification scheme. Activities are the major tasks performed by an organisation to accomplish each of its functions.

An activity is identified by the name it is given and its scope note. The scope of the activity encompasses all the transactions that take place in relation to it. Depending upon the nature of the transactions involved, an activity may be performed in relation to one function, or it may be performed in relation to many functions.


AGGREGATION

Reference:

Any accumulation of record entities at a level above record object (document, digital document) eg folder, digital folder or series.


ANALYSIS

Reference:

A systematic approach to problem solving. which involves breaking an idea or problem down into parts..


APPRAISAL

Reference:

The process of evaluating business activities to determine which records need to be captured and how long the records need to be kept to meet business needs, the requirements of organisational accountability and community expectations.


ARCHIVES

Reference:

Records that are appraised as having archival value.

This definition of the term differs to the IT sphere where it refers to a copy of one or more files, or a copy of a database that is saved for future reference or for recovery purposes in case the original data is damaged or lost.


ARRANGEMENT

Reference:

The process of organising information to facilitate management and use. Includes the creation of intellectual structures such as file plans and metadata models, and physical structures such as document and file storage systems.

In any arrangement there may be many levels named according to accepted principles. For example accepted archival principles recognise collection, record group, subgroup, series, sub-series, file unit, and item,


ASSOCIATIVE RELATIONSHIP

Reference:

A relationship that links together Related Terms. The relationship is reciprocal but non-directional.


ATTRIBUTE

Reference:

In computing, an attribute is a specification that defines a property of an object, element, or file. It may also refer to or set the specific value for a given instance of such.
However, in actual usage, the term attribute can and is often treated as equivalent to a property depending on the technology being discussed.
For clarity, attributes should more correctly be considered metadata. An attribute is frequently and generally a property of a property.


AUTO CATEGORIZATION

Reference:

A methodology that creates categories for a collection of information objects by analysing their text and finding common concepts to describe and sort them.


AUTO CLASSIFICATION

Reference:

A methodology that that attempts to classify content by analysing it's text and then assigning the object to a pre-defined class.


BROADER TERM

Reference:

A preferred term with a meaning wider in scope than the term in question, and shown superordinate to the latter in a hierarchy.

Abbreviated BT.


BROWSING

Reference:

The process of finding information by examining lists or sequences of items, typically starting with general items and, on the basis of what has been found there, moving to more specific items


BUSINESS ACTIVITY CLASSIFICATION

Reference:

An approach to classification based on the analysis of business activities which is documented in a business classification scheme.

Also known as functional classification.


BUSINESS ANALYSIS

Reference:

A process used by organizations to improve how it conducts its functions and activities in order to reduce overall costs, provide more efficient use of resources, and better support customers. It introduces the notion of process orientation, of concentrating on and rethinking end-to-end activities that create value for customers, while removing unnecessary, non-value added work. The person who carries out this task is called a business analyst or BA.


BUSINESS CLASSIFICATION SCHEME

Reference:

A classification scheme documenting the functions, activities and transactions undertaken by a business. The scheme is derived from the analysis of business activity (as in Step B of DIRKS).


CAPTURE

Reference:

A deliberate action that results in the capture of a record into a recordkeeping system and the assignment of metadata to describe the record and place it in context,

For certain business activities this functionality may be built into computer systems so that the capture of records and assignment of metadata is concurrent with the creation of records


CLASSIFICATION (1)

Reference:

The systematic identification and arrangement of [business activities and/or] records into categories according to logically structured conventions, methods, and procedural rules represented in a classification system.


CLASSIFICATION (2)

Reference:

Grouping together of similar or related things and the separation of dissimilar or unrelated things and the arrangement of the resulting groups in a logical and helpful sequence


CLASSIFICATION SCHEME

Reference:

A controlled vocabulary for classifying or categorising information.


CLASSIFICATION TOOLS

Reference:

Lists, schemes, models used to classify or title records. Includes records classification schemes and alphabetical thesauri.


COMPLIANCE

Reference:

Adherence to requirements outlined in contracts, laws, policies, procedures, specifications, and regulations, etc.


CONFORMANCE/CONFORMITY

Reference:

Acting in accordance with customs, rules, and accepted standards.

ie conformance with ISO 15489 Standard for Records Management.


CONSEQUENCE

Reference:

The outcome of an event or situation ie a loss, injury, disadvantage or opportunity.


CONTENT (1)

Reference:

The textual information located within a document.


CONTENT (2)

Reference:

That which conveys information, eg text, data, symbols, numerals, images, sound and vision.


CONTEXT (1)

Reference:

The circumstances and conditions which "surround" an event.


CONTEXT (2)

Reference:

The background information that enhances understanding of technical and business environments to which the records relate, eg. information on the application software, logical business models and the provenance of the record.


CONTEXTUAL PATH

Reference:

Describes all the relationships of a term to the top of the hierarchy, which is often called the top-term or keyword.


CONTROLLED VOCABULARY

Reference:

A list of predefined, authorised terms, each one having a prescribed meaning., designed for use in classifying or indexing documents, and for searching them.

As opposed to Natural Language.


CONVERSION

Reference:

The process of changing records (and information) from one medium to another or from one format to another.


CUSTODY

Reference:

Responsibility for the management of records and archives, usually based on physical possession. Does not necessarily mean legal ownership.


DATA DICTIONARY (1)

Reference:

A formal repository of terms used to describe data.


DATA DICTIONARY (2)

Reference:

A collection of detailed information about data elements, fields, tables and other entities that comprise the data model underlying a database or similar data management system.

The data dictionary maps the relationships between these entities and may be used to gain an understanding of the structure and internal operating processes of a system.


DATA/INFORMATION STORAGE.

Reference:

The retaining of data/information on any of a variety of mediums (i.e., magnetic disk, optical disk, or magnetic tape) from which the data can be retrieved.


DECLARATION

Reference:

The act of assigning to a captured document the status of a 'record'.

Declaration is not found in ISO 15489, and is not considered an accepted practice as it does not fit with the definition of a record.


DIRKS

Reference:

The acronym for 'designing and implementing recordkeeping systems', a methodology for managing records and other business information that is outlined in the Standard for Records Management ISO 15489.


DISPOSAL

Reference:

Any action that changes the circumstances of a record or removes a record from its usual setting. Disposal can include destruction, damage, alteration or transfer of custody or ownership of records.

The National Archives authorises disposal of Commonwealth records for the purposes of the Archives Act 1983. Also called disposition, usually in the North American context.


Disposal Action

Reference:


Disposal Authority

Reference:


Disposal Class

Reference:


Disposal Schedule

Reference:


Disposal Trigger

Reference:


DISPOSITION

Reference:

The range of processes associated with implementing records retention, destruction or transfer decision which are documented in disposition authorities or other instruments.


DISPOSITION (DISPOSAL) ACTION

Reference:

The action noted in a disposition rule indicating the minimum retention period for a record and the event from which the disposal date should be calculated.


DISPOSITION (DISPOSAL) AUTHORITY

Reference:

A formal instrument that defines the retention periods and consequent disposal actions authorised for classes of records described in the authority.


Disposition Class

Reference:


DISPOSITION SCHEDULE

Reference:

A comprehensive instruction covering the disposition of records to assure that they are retained for as long as necessary based on their administrative, fiscal, legal and historic value.


DISPOSITION TRIGGER

Reference:

The point from which the disposition action is calculated. This can be a date on which action is completed or a date on which an event occurs.


DOCUMENT

Reference:

Recorded information or object that can be treated as a unit.


DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT

Reference:

The management and control of documents with emphasis on their dynamic and transactional nature including indexing and retrieval, revision and version control, work flow and information content


DOCUMENT TYPE

Reference:

Categorisation of documents into mutually exclusive groups to aid the designing of document templates, and hence the capture of metadata at the creation stage in an electronic document or records management system. Its use also aids subsequent retrieval by allowing users to search by document type. Document types tend to be categorised generically, for example as 'letter', 'minutes' or 'reports' rather than by the specific content of these documents.


ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM EDRMS

Reference:

A type of content management system combining technologies of document management and records management systems as an integrated system.


ENTERPRISE CONTENT MANAGEMENT (ECM)

Reference:

The strategies, methods and tools used to capture, manage, store, preserve, and deliver content and documents related to organizational processes. ECM tools and strategies allow the management of an organization's unstructured information, wherever that information exists.


ENTERPRISE CONTENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Reference:

Enterprise content management systems combine a wide variety of technologies and components, some of which can also be used as stand-alone systems without being incorporated into an enterprise-wide system.
The five ECM components and technologies of the ECM model were first defined by AIIM as follows:
capture
manage
store
preserve
deliver


ENUMERATIVE CLASSIFICATION.

Reference:

An enumerative classification system is a system that lists all the specific subject classes. (as opposed to faceted classification).

Enumerative classification attempts to assign headings for every subject and alphabetically enumerate them.


EQUIVALENCE

Reference:

Equivalence is the relationship between a preferred term and a corresponding non-preferred term. This relationship is reciprocal and directional.


FACET (1)

Reference:

A high level grouping of concepts of the same inherent category, e.g. activities, disciplines, people, materials, places, times.


FACET (2)

Reference:

A certain classifiable characteristic of the resource -- a way to classify something.


FACET ANALYSIS

Reference:

The analysis of compound subjects into terms, the organisation of these terms into facets, the display of relationships between the terms, and the synthesis of terms into compound subject headings.

Amanda Maple


FACETED CLASSIFICATION (1)

Reference:

Allows the assignment of multiple classifications to an object, allowing searching and browsing of related information through several classes. Elements may include subject, geographical, temporal and form of an item.


FACETED CLASSIFICATION (2)

Reference:

A faceted classification differs from a traditional one in that it does not assign fixed slots to subjects in sequence, but uses clearly defined, mutually exclusive, and collectively exhaustive aspects, properties, or characteristics of a class or specific subject.

Such aspects, properties, or characteristics are called facets of a class or subject, a term introduced into classification theory and given this new meaning by the Indian librarian and classificationist S.R. Ranganathan and first used in his Colon Classification in the early 1930s.

Wynar, Bohdan S. Introduction to cataloging and classification. 8th edition. p. 320


FILE

Reference:

1. (Noun) An organised unit of documents accumulated during current use and kept together because they deal with the same subject, activity or transaction.

2. (Verb) The action of placing documents in a predetermined location according to a scheme of control.


FILE PART

Reference:

A part of a file (or item) which has no independent intellectual existence or control apart from the other part(s) of the file.


FILE PLAN (1)

Reference:

A classification scheme for the physical arrangement, storage, and retrieval of files.


FILE PLAN (2)

Reference:

A pre-determined logical and systematic structure into which records are arranged and intellectually stored according to subject groups and subjects to facilitate efficient retrieval and disposal of records.


FILE STRING

Reference:

The terms from the contextual path that have been applied to a level of aggregation.

Personnel>Policy>Recruitment Policy


FLAT LISTS

Reference:

Short lists without relationships. typically used as drop down lists.


FULL AND ACCURATE RECORDS

Reference:

Full and accurate records must be: compliant with the recordkeeping requirements arising from the regulatory and accountability environment in which the organisation operates; adequate for the purposes for which they are kept; complete containing not only the content, but also the structural and contextual information necessary to document a transaction; meaningful containing information and/or linkages that ensure the business context in which the record was created and used is apparent; comprehensive documenting the complete range of the organisation's business for which evidence is required; accurate to reflect the transactions that they document; authentic enabling proof that they are what they purport to be and that their purported creators did indeed create them; and inviolate securely maintained to prevent unauthorised access, alteration or removal.


FUNCTION (1)

Reference:

The first level of a business classification scheme.

Functions represent the major responsibilities that are managed by the organisation to fulfil its goals. They are high-level aggregates of the organisation's activities.


FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS

Reference:

The features an organization desires in a software program.

May be calculations, technical details, data manipulation and processing and other specific functionality that define what a system is supposed to accomplish.

Functional requirements are supported by non-functional requirements which impose constraints on the design or implementation (such as performance requirements, security, or reliability).

How a system implements functional requirements is detailed in the system design.


FUNCTIONS THESAURUS

Reference:

1. A thesaurus that reflects the unique functions of an agency.

2. An alphabetical classification tool that reflects the business activities of an agency and their relationships. A functions thesaurus can be used to classify, title, retrieve, sentence and dispose of records and other business information.

3. The thesaurus stems from an organisation's business classification scheme and usually contains function terms, activity terms, topic terms and non-preferred terms.


GAP ANALYSIS

Reference:

The identification of the difference between the desired and current state.


GUIDELINE

Reference:

Non-mandatory, supplemental information about acceptable methods for implementing requirements found in directives, processes, procedures, work instructions, etc.


HIERARCHICAL RELATIONSHIP

Reference:

A Hierarchical relationship is that between a Broader Term and a Narrower Term.
It is reciprocal and directional.


HIERARCHY (1)

Reference:

Used to denote any system of things arranged in levels. It does not imply a whole / part, generic, instance, or any other specific hierarchical relationship. In records management classification tools, the hierarchy is usually function - activity - subject/transaction.


HIERARCHY (2)

Reference:

Relationship based on degrees or levels of superordination and subordination, where the superordinate term represents a class or whole, and subordinate terms refer to its members or parts. (ISO 2788, Clause 8.3)

A relationship between terms that is based on a ranking or order from a superior to a subordinate position. For example, the activity Child Maintenance Management is a subset of the broader term Legal Case Management.


IDENTITY (IDENTIFICATION)

Reference:

The process of persistently linking a record or aggregation with a unique identifier.


IMPLEMENTATION

Reference:

Working within limits set by policy. Development of directives, procedures, etc., and supporting systems and training and documentation may be necessary to effect policy successfully.


INACTIVE RECORD

Reference:

A record that is not required to be readily available for the business purposes of a department or agency and which may therefore be transferred to intermediate storage, archival custody, or be destroyed subject to applicable laws


INDEXING

Reference:

Process of establishing access points to facilitate retrieval of records and/or information.


INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE (1)

Reference:

The design, analysis, and organisation or modelling of information, with a particular emphasis on the interrelationships between data.


INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE (2)

Reference:

The structural design of shared information environments.
The art and science of organizing and labeling web sites, intranets, online communities and
software to support usability and findability.
An emerging community of practice focused on bringing principles of design and architecture to
the digital landscape.


INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE (3)

Reference:

The blueprint that describes how information is organized and structured. It has been described as identifying and leveraging patterns in data that make would-be-complex sets of information, increasingly easier to understand.


INFORMATION LIFE CYCLE

Reference:

Activities involved in managing information throughout its life e.g. information acquisition, creation, retention, storage, retrieval, communication, utilisation and destruction.


INFORMATION RISKS

Reference:

Risks that relate to the access to, or the use of inaccurate, irrelevant or untimely information, unreliable systems, and inaccurate or misleading reporting in support of decisions. The ability to accurately forecast future costs based on historical trends would be an example of information risk. Most other risk categories would have an information risk component.


INHERITANCE

Reference:

A fundamental principle of Object Oriented Programming (OOP). The ability of a class to derive data and behaviour from another class. This promotes reuse and maintainability.

The object-oriented concept where a child class also has the features (attributes and methods) of its parent class. One of the types of relationships between objects in the data representation model.


INTEGRATION

Reference:

The activity of combining multiple software components and making them work together.


INTEROPERABILITY (1)

Reference:

Ability of two or more systems or components to exchange information and to use the information that has been exchanged.


INTEROPERABILITY (2)

Reference:

The ability of different types of computers, networks, operating systems, and applications to work together effectively, without prior communication, in order to exchange information in a useful and meaningful manner.


INTEROPERABILITY (3)

Reference:

The capacity of metadata to be transferred between agencies or migrated across systems with minimal manipulation will allow records to function as authoritative evidence of business activities within and between organisational boundaries for as long as they are required.

The adoption of a common metadata standard among agencies, supported by software vendors, will enable government records to be available, accessible and usable over time, irrespective of the agency or system within which they reside at any given time.


JURISDICTION

Reference:

In law; the territory within which power can be exercised.

In records management; the territory to which rules, legislation, policy etc. applies.


KEYWORD AAA

Reference:

A thesaurus of general terminology designed for use in the Australian public sector for classifying, titling and indexing administrative records in most technological environments. It covers administrative terminology common to most organisations and should be used in conjunction with a functions thesaurus relating to the organisation's specific functions to provide comprehensive controlled vocabulary coverage. It was developed by the Archives Authority of New South Wales.


LEAD-IN ENTRY

Reference:

In a controlled vocabulary, an entry provided to guide a user from a non-preferred term to the corresponding preferred term.


LINK

Reference:

The means of connection between things linked in series.


MACHINERY OF GOVERNMENT CHANGE

Reference:

A process whereby agencies and departments are created, modified or abolished and responsibility for legislation and functions (and records) is transferred from one department or agency to another.


METADATA (1)

Reference:

Data describing context, content and structure of records and their management through time.


METADATA (2)

Reference:

IT: Data that describes other data. The term may also refer to any computer file or database that holds information about another database's structure, processing, changes, etc. Data dictionaries and data repositories are examples of metadata.

RM: Metadata is a term that describes or specifies characteristics that need to be known about data in order to build information resources such as electronic recordkeeping systems and support records creators and users.


METATAGGING

Reference:

Metatagging is the process of putting a label on something.


MIGRATION

Reference:

Act of moving records from one system to another, while maintaining the records authenticity, integrity, reliability and usability.

Migration involves a set of organised tasks designed to periodically transfer digital material from one hardware or software configuration to another, or from one generation of technology to another.


NARROWER TERM

Reference:

A preferred term with a meaning narrower in scope than the term in question, and shown subordinate to the latter in a hierarchy.

Abbreviated NT.


NATURAL LANGUAGE

Reference:

Living language that is flexible, variable and fluid. Natural language is the language of thought and conversation. It is the language used in free text titling.


NODE LABEL HEADING:

Reference:

A heading consisting of a term used in the systematic section of a thesaurus to indicate the logical basis on which a category is divided.


NODE LABELS

Reference:

A term that acts as a parent to terms and which is used systematically to indicate a logical category for the term consistently throughout the hierarchy. Also known as facets or nested sets.

Generally appear between angled brackets.

Example: <personnel policy>
Recruitment Policy
Employee Code of Conduct

Node labels are not to be used for retrieval purposes; they are dummy terms which serve an organizational function only. Node labels group together related or sibling preferred terms together under one heading.


NON-PREFERRED TERM

Reference:

The synonym or quasi-synonym of a preferred term. Non-preferred terms are not themselves used for classifying or indexing resources, but are provided as entry points to help people find the most appropriate preferred terms.
(For example, "senior citizens Use Older people".)

They are also known as lead-in terms.


NORMAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICE (NAP)

Reference:

This is the exception to the general prohibition on disposal of Commonwealth records that allows the disposal (destruction, transfer or alteration) of records in the normal course of business without a disposal authority. This disposal can only take place provided that there is no adverse risk to the proper recording of agency business. NAP is often interpreted as allowing the disposal of material of a facilitative or transitory nature created or acquired by agency officers during the course of day-to-day business.


OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING (OOP)

Reference:

A method of software development that is used to design systems by grouping conceptually related code into objects, often these objects are representations of corresponding real-world entities, such as an Employee or a Car.

A programming technology that make use of reusable, modular components; includes the processes of encapsulation and inheritance and ability to create an object before its exact character is known.

A programming technique in which programs are perceived as a collection of objects that contains attributes and behavior. All of them interact with one another to form a functional system.


OBJECTIVES

Reference:

The broadest statements of what the organization chooses to accomplish. Generally defines as measurable goals. Explicit objectives are those stated in the business plan. Implicit objectives are those inherent or assumed in any organization.


ONTOLOGY (1)

Reference:

In computer science, an ontology is a data model that represents a domain and is used to reason about the objects in that domain and the relations between them.

Ontologies are used in artificial intelligence, the semantic web, software engineering and information architecture as a form of knowledge representation about the world or some part of it.

Ontologies generally describe:
- Individuals: the basic or "ground level" objects
- Classes: sets, collections, or types of objects
- Attributes: properties, features, characteristics, or parameters that objects can have and share
- Relations: ways that objects can be related to one another


ONTOLOGY (2)

Reference:

Ontologies resemble faceted taxonomies but use richer semantic relationships among terms and attributes, as well as strict rules about how to specify terms and relationships. Because ontologies do more than just control a vocabulary, they are thought of as knowledge representation. The oft-quoted definition of ontology is "the specification of one's conceptualisation of a knowledge domain."


OUTCOME

Reference:

Information, event, object or state of being produced as a result or consequence of a plan, process, accident, effort or other similar action or occurrence.


POLICY (1)

Reference:

A statement of principles and/or values that mandate or constrain the performance of activities used in achieving organisational goals. A policy is general in nature, has broad application and helps to ensure compliance with: applicable laws and regulations; contract requirements; and delegation of authority by the Board. Policies promote operational efficiencies and reduce organisational risk.

Policies do not contain requirements. Directives, processes, procedures, work instructions, and the like flow from policies and the requirements are specified in them.


POLICY (2)

Reference:

A governing principle that embraces general goals and mandates or constrains actions.


PREFERRED TERM (1)

Reference:

Term used in indexing to represent a given concept. Also called descriptor.


PREFERRED TERM (2)

Reference:

A term used in a controlled vocabulary to represent a given concept.


PRESERVATION

Reference:

Processes and operations involved in ensuring the technical and intellectual survival of authentic records through time.


PRINCIPLE

Reference:

A basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct;
a basic truth or law or assumption.


PROCEDURE (1)

Reference:

A written, approved specification for execution of some activity - often composed of steps, using established methods or forms - designed to achieve a uniform approach to compliance with applicable policies or directives.


PROCEDURE (2)

Reference:

A statement(s) that prescribes specific actions to be taken to implement established policies.


PROCESS

Reference:

A process is a series of inter-related activities that result in an outcome. Several procedures reflect a process.


RECORDKEEPING

Reference:

The making and maintaining of complete, accurate and reliable evidence of business transactions in the form of recorded information.

Recordkeeping includes: the creation of records in the course of business activity and the means to ensure the creation of adequate records; the design, establishment and operation of recordkeeping systems; and the management of records used in business (traditionally regarded as the domain of records management) and as archives (traditionally regarded as the domain of archives administration).


RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS

Reference:

The identified needs for evidence or information arising from various documentary and oral sources that may be satisfied through appropriate recordkeeping action (such as creation, capture, maintenance, preservation and access). The sources include legislative and other regulatory sources, industry codes of best practice, broader identifiable government interests, external clients or stakeholders and the general public.


RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS 2

Reference:

Requirements relating to the management of records arising from regulatory sources, business needs and community expectations.


RECORDKEEPING SYSTEMS

Reference:

Information system which captures, manages and provides access to records through time.


RECORDS

Reference:

Information created, received, and maintained as evidence and information by an organisation or person, in pursuance of legal obligations or in the transaction of business.


RECORDS CLASS

Reference:

A group of records documenting similar activities, together with a disposal action to be applied to the group.

Data relating to the class comprises a title and record description, one or more disposition rules, and a unique entry or class number.

Typically classes are grouped together within a Disposition Schedule or Disposition Authority.

ISO 15489 Standard for Records Management advocates that classes are linked to a business classification scheme (BCS).


RECORDS CONTINUUM

Reference:

The whole extent of a record's existence. Refers to a consistent and coherent regime of management processes from the time of the creation of records (and before creation, in the design of recordkeeping systems) through to the preservation and use of records as archives.


RECORDS MANAGEMENT

Reference:

Field of management responsible for the efficient and systematic control of the creation, receipt, maintenance, use and disposition of records, including processes for capturing and maintaining evidence of and information about business activities and transactions in the form of records.


REDUNDANCY (1)

Reference:

The user interface of a software application or operating system is sometimes described as redundant if the same task can be executed by several different methods. For example, a user is often able to open or save a project by navigating a menu with the mouse, by clicking a single button with the mouse, or by entering a key stroke.


REGISTRATION

Reference:

Act of giving a record a unique identifier on its entry into a system.


RELATED TERM

Reference:

A preferred term which is associatively related to the term in question. Abbreviated RT.


RETENTION PERIOD

Reference:

The length of time after the disposal trigger that a record must be maintained and accessible. At the expiration of the retention period, a record may be subject to disposal.


Retention Schedule

Reference:


RIM

Reference:

Common acronym for Records and Information Management


RISK

Reference:

The chance of something happening that will impact on the achievement of objectives. Risk can represent an opportunity or a threat to the achievement of objectives. It is observed as a variance from objective.


RISK ANALYSIS

Reference:

A systematic use of available information to determine how often specified events may occur and the magnitude of their consequences.


SCOPE NOTES

Reference:

Defines the meaning of a particular term, or combination of terms, in a business classification scheme or a classification tool (such as a functions thesaurus) and guides users on how such terms should be applied. It facilitates consistency in usage by discouraging personal interpretations of the same term by different people across an organisation.


SECURITY CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

Reference:

A set of procedures for identifying and protecting official information whose disclosure could have adverse consequences for the Commonwealth. The security classification system is implemented by assigning markings (such as TOP SECRET or PROTECTED and so) on that show the value of the information and indicate the minimum level of protection it must be afforded.


SEMI-ACTIVE RECORD

Reference:

A record required so infrequently in the conduct of current business that it can be transferred from offices to separate storage areas.


SENTENCING

Reference:

The process of identifying the disposal class a record belongs to and applying the disposal action specified in the relevant disposal authority to the record.

Sentencing is the implementation of decisions made during appraisal.


SIBLINGS

Reference:

Two or more terms with the same immediate Broader Term.


SOURCES

Reference:

Sources of information (ie documentary, verbal) which provide information or justification.


STAKEHOLDERS

Reference:

Any party which has vested interests.

In records management, individuals and organizations having an interest or stake in a organization's records and recordkeeping.


STRATEGY

Reference:

A strategy is a long term plan of action designed to achieve a particular goal. A plan for getting from current to desired future state.


SYSTEM DESIGN

Reference:

Systems design is the process or art of defining the architecture, components, modules, interfaces, and data for a system to satisfy specified requirements .


TAXONOMIC CLASSIFICATION

Reference:

Taxonomic classification is the act of placing an object or concept into a set or sets of categories (such as a taxonomy or a subject index), based on the properties of the object or concept. A person may classify the object or concept according to an ontology.
Examples of taxonomic classification include:
Library classification
Scientific classification of organisms.
Classification of finite simple groups
Medical classification like ICD
Security classification
Folksonomy


TAXONOMY (1)

Reference:

Taxonomy (from Greek verb tassein = "to classify" and nomos = law, science, cf "economy") was once only the science of classifying living organisms (alpha taxonomy), but later the word was applied in a wider sense, and may also refer to either a classification of things, or the principles underlying the classification.

Almost anything, animate objects, inanimate objects, places, and events, may be classified according to some taxonomic scheme.


TAXONOMY (2)

Reference:

A taxonomy is a collection of controlled vocabulary terms organized into a hierarchical structure. Each term in a taxonomy is in one or more parent-child relationships to other terms in the taxonomy. There may be different types of parent-child relationships in a taxonomy (e.g., whole-part, genus-species, type-instance), but good practice limits all parent-child relationships to a single parent to be of the same type. Some taxonomies allow poly-hierarchy, which means that a term can have multiple parents. This means that if a term appears in multiple places in a taxonomy, then it is the same term. Specifically, if a term has children in one place in a taxonomy, then it has the same children in every other place where it appears.


TERM

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A word or phrase used to designate a concept.

Where more than one term in a controlled vocabulary can designate the same concept, one is chosen as a preferred term and the others are treated as non-preferred terms.


TERM TYPE

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The basis on which a term is derived.


THESAURUS (1)

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A classification tool comprising an alphabetical presentation of a controlled list of terms linked together by semantic, hierarchical, associative or equivalence relationships.


THESAURUS (2)

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A controlled vocabulary designed primarily to assist searching in postcoordinate information retrieval systems. The terms in a thesaurus are formally organised to avoid ambiguities and to show hierarchical and associative relationships between them (see definitions of broader, narrower and related terms below).

The purpose of a thesaurus is to guide both the indexer and the searcher to select the same term or combination of terms to represent a given concept.


THESAURUS (3)

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An alphabetical presentation of a controlled list of terms, linked together by semantic, hierarchical, associative or equivalence relationships. Such a tool acts as a guide to allocating classification terms to individual records. (AS ISO 15489, Part 2, Clause 4.2.3.2)

In a thesaurus, the meaning of the term is specified and hierarchical relationships to other terms are shown. A thesaurus should provide sufficient entry points to allow users to navigate from terms that are not to be used to the preferred terminology adopted by the organisation.


TOP TERM

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A term which has no Broader Terms in the vocabulary.

Abbreviation: TT


TRACKING

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Creating, capturing and maintaining information about the movement and use of records.


TRANSACTION

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The smallest unit of business activity.

A transaction should be activity-based rather than subject- or topic-based. A transaction provides the basis for identifying, in detail, the records that meet the business needs of the organisation. Depending on the complexity of an organisation's business activities, it may be necessary to group transactions on the basis of their similarities or to further dissect this level to obtain an appropriate degree of specificity for the organisation's recordkeeping purposes.

A particular instance in the performance of an activity.

In some cases, the term transaction is used to cover a class of transactions that occur in the performance of an activity.


TRANSFER - CUSTODY

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Change of custody, ownership and/or responsibility for records.


TRANSFER - MOVEMENT

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Moving records from one location to another.


UNSTRUCTURED INFORMATION

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Unstructured data (or unstructured information) refers to (usually) computerized information that either does not have a data structure or has one that is not easily usable by a computer program. The term distinguishes such information from data stored in fielded form in databases or annotated (semantically tagged) in documents.


USABILITY

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In design, usability is the study of the ease with which people can employ a particular tool or other human-made object in order to achieve a particular goal .


VITAL RECORDS

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Records without which an organisation could not continue to operate, that is, those containing information needed to re-establish the organisation in the event of a disaster. Vital records are those which protect the assets and interests of the organisation as well as those of its clients and shareholders.


WORKFLOW

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A workflow consists of a sequence of connected steps. It is a depiction of a sequence of operations, declared as work of a person, a group of persons, an organization of staff, or one or more simple or complex mechanisms.


WORKFLOW MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

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A workflow management system is a computer system that manages and defines a series of tasks within an organisation to produce a final outcome or outcomes.